Academic Vocabulary, Language, and Math

Ask yourself this seemingly simple question: What’s the difference between Academic Vocabulary and Academic Language? They sound similar, right?  We not only need to recognize the similarities and differences of these two concepts, we need to provide opportunities for all students to engage in both in our classes, including Math. Earlier this month, I had the privilege of collaborating with our district’s Sheltered Instructional Coach, Maranda Turner, and six of our talented high school math teachers doing just that.

Our work was centered on deepening our understanding of instruction that supports all students, particularly students struggling with language and literacy in math. We walked away with a solid understanding of the difference between academic vocabulary and academic language, along with engagement strategies to help us plan specific activities aligned to research based strategies to help all learners succeed.

Vocabulary Word Box used during the session.

Illustrated Vocabulary organizer used during the session.

The first part of our morning was spent making sure our next unit was aligned to the Common Core Learning Targets in our pacing guide. Research by John Hattie shows students make academic growth when we communicate and engage our students in learning targets. Besides students being able to really answer their parent’s age-old question: “What did you learn at school today?” they also have a defined purpose for doing the work being assigned to them.

Algebra 1 Semester 2 Unit 7

Algebra 1 Semester 2 Unit 7

The rest of the day we zeroed in on the particulars of academic vocabulary (words specific to the content area) and academic language (how to communicate the vocabulary in a “math way”). Each teacher pair chose 2-3 priority academic vocabulary words for the next unit, determined an appropriate activity, identified opportunities to practice the academic language, and establish where it would fit into the unit. Activities included the use of Illustrated Vocabulary Boxes, Frayer Models,  (low/no prep) Word Sorts, and Sentence Stems and Sentence Frames.  We discussed the importance of allowing students plenty of written and spoken rehearsals as they worked to use new academic language.  

Academic Language Frame for Math.

Academic Language Frame for Math.

After each instructional component (learning targets, academic vocabulary, academic language), teachers were provided 30-60 minutes to plan these tools into their instruction. It wasn’t nearly enough, considering the work needed in all units, but it’s the right work, and teachers appreciated the supportive start.  We know that when change is hard, we must narrow the path.  Consider this: take one strategy; use it once or twice a week in one course. How soon would the strategy become automatic and in all courses?   

Let me know if you are interested in spending some time working on how to support kids in their math language and literacy. I know a coach….

 

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